Princeton Splash
Welcome to Princeton Splash, a student-run organization at Princeton University

Splash Spring 13
Course Catalog


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Arts Engineering
Humanities Math & Computer Science
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Arts

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A22: Drawing Figures - Body Language and Other Cool Things that make art interesting!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Silken Jones

Have you ever realized how much we communicate through body language? One of the best tools in making your own art is being able to draw the appropriate body language! This will be a fun, easy-going setting, meant for people of all creative inclinations. (Seriously. You can make beautiful drawings with only stick figures if you draw expressive poses! You do not have to be a talented artist by any means, all are welcome!)


Prerequisites
A pencil :)

A75: Story to Film: How Books are Made into Movies
Difficulty: **

Understanding how filmmakers create movie versions of novels, by adapting a novel into a movie in this class!

A49: Chinese Knotting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tracie Kong

In this hands-on class, you will learn to make an ornament using this traditional knotting art, and you will get to keep your handicraft! Materials provided. Complete novices with no idea about Chinese knotting are welcome :D Here is good a website as way of introduction: http://www.co.middlesex.nj.us/culturalheritage/chineseknotting/index.html


Prerequisites
Interest in arts and craft :)

A110: Beatboxing for Beginners
Difficulty: *

Learn to make percussion sounds and neat beats with your voice!


Prerequisites
Do you have a mouth? Rhythmic sensibilities are helpful.

A23: Faces! How do draw a face, show emotion, and other neat tips that make faces easier to make!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Silken Jones

Human faces often pop up in art, but actually creating something that passes for a face can be very difficult, especially if you're not artistically inclined. Don't let that stop you! Learn easy tips that let you make your own art. You'll surprise yourself at how good you can be when you try! Sometimes, you just need a few quick, easy tricks to solve the problem

Because of the subject matter, this provides a great opportunity to discuss the marvel that is the human face, and all the things it can express!


Prerequisites
none! No artistic talent required! You don't even have to draw if you don't want, you can simply participate in the discussion on the human face and what we can learn from it

A54: Basic Marionette Manipulation Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Samantha Ritter

Come play with puppets! This workshop will teach students how to operate traditional wooden marionette puppets on strings. Students will first learn basic puppet operation, and will then improvise short scenes with the puppets.

A66: Advanced Origami
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Qihui Xu

Learn how to make more difficult origami like roses and snowflakes!


Prerequisites
Able to make a crane or other basic origami

A55: Theatrical Lighting
Difficulty: **

This class will demonstrate the different parts of a light, and explain the different types of theatrical lights commonly used (liko, par, strips, practicals, etc.) Then, we will demonstrate how different light angles (front, side, back, low, high, etc.) affect our perceptions of the actors on stage. We will teach them how to write a light cue, and
we will have some fun with a mini scene!

A127: Juggling
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Simon Leblanc

Learn how to juggle, from basics to more advanced tricks. Everybody is welcome!

A111: Paper Creations - The Art of Modular Origami
Difficulty: *

Learn how to make modular origami!

In modular origami, we assemble flat and three-dimensional structures by folding and attaching single units/modules. More than one sheet of paper is used for each creation, allowing for much more complexity than is standard for normal one-sheet origami.

NO GLUE, NO TAPE, NO STRINGS ATTACHED!

For examples of modular origami, visit here: http://hektor.umcs.lublin.pl/~mikosmul/origami/

A90: Musical Theatre 101
Difficulty: **

In this class, students will learn a segment of the music and choreography to "Populism, Yea, Yea!" from the rock musical Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, under the instruction of the choreographer and cast members of the Princeton University Players' current production of the show. We will use this song and short rehearsal experience to inspire discussion about connecting theatre with other disciplines and issues, pursuing extracurricular theatre in college, making musical theatre as a student-run organization, and more. No experience necessary: the music and choreography that we will teach are well-suited for beginners, and we will adjust the pace of the class according to students' individual needs.

A85: Improv Comedy with Quipfire!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: amy solomon

Come learn about improv with Quipfire! Improv Comedy, Princeton's oldest improv comedy group!

A28: Breakdance 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dennard Dayle

Learn basic breaking with Dennard Dayle from Sympoh Urban Arts Crew! This class requires no dance experience whatsoever, and will cover basic techniques with a little bit of history.

A60: Irish Dancing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kate Kaneko

Ever seen Riverdance and wish that you were the next Michael Flatley? Enroll today and find out!! ALL skill levels are welcome, with or without experience!

A76: Digital Stories: Making New Kinds of Games, Art, and Literature
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Katherine Ye

Come learn about all kinds of mashups, Twitter and Tumblr gone weird, tiny games, and interactive literature. Technology and the Internet have created a rich subculture of creators making new kinds of art, and we'll have lots to explore. We will be playing and making our own interactive stories in the second hour of class.


Prerequisites
A laptop that you can install software on is highly recommended. A bit of programming experience will enhance the class, but is not required.


Engineering

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E128: Learn how to build everything (a sampler) Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Emily TenCate

Do you want to build a toy robot? How about a roller coaster? Have you heard of a laser cutter or a waterjet? We won't actually be making roller coasters in this class, but we'll introduce you to some of the tools you need to get you started on building and prototyping whatever you want.

E93: Energy Conversion and Storage: A Focus on Renewable Energy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Collen Leng

What is a solar cell, and how does it work? Why is the transition from fossil fuel energy to renewable energy so difficult? Do biofuels burn differently than conventional hydrocarbon fuels?

This course will go over the basic technologies in the renewable energy and energy storage fields. The costs and benefits of renewable energy will also be discussed.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of physics, chemistry, and math can be very helpful.

E108: Getting Started with Arduino
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wanted to build a self-balancing robot, RFID cat door, or automate your house lights? Then you should get an Arduino!

Arduino is an "open source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software." It's super easy to use and enables a whole host of interesting projects and applications.

In this course, we'll introduce you to the Arduino platform and walk you through some simple projects, culminating in the design of an electronic instrument.

Even if you don't own an Arduino, you'll walk out of this course with the knowledge to begin tackling your very own electronics projects.

Join us for a fun hour of electronics breadboarding, prototyping, building, and hacking!


Prerequisites
No previous knowledge required. Familiarity with resistors and LEDs is helpful, but not necessary.


Humanities

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H124: History of Modern India
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rahul Subramanian

Covers the history of India in the years following independence from Great Britain in 1947. Will cover (at least) the following topics:
Indian Independence Movement and the influence of Mahatma Gandhi
Partition
Early Modernization Efforts Under Prime Minister Nehru
Indira Gandhi and the imposition of Emergency rule in the 1970s/Restoration of Democracy
Economic Liberalization in the 1990s
Contemporary Political/Economic Challenges/Globalization

The course will also touch on some of the economic policies pursued during various governments as well as outline the rise of major civic movements (many influenced by the ideals of Mahatma Gandhi)into the present day. Exact emphasis/further elaboration on specific themes will depend on student interest.


Prerequisites
Assumes basic familiarity or interest in world history.

H86: Introduction to Asian American Studies
Difficulty: **

Did you know that Asian Americans once argued to the Supreme Court that they were white so that they could gain citizenship? The history of Asian Americans is dynamic, expands upon the white-black dichotomy that dominates American racial dialogue, and remains largely unknown by most people. Beyond just the historical aspect of Asian American Studies, we will also examine modern aspects of the Asian American community Examples include the model minority myth, the possible existence of racial quotas at universities, and modern immigration patterns.
Absolutely everyone is welcome! Sociology, law, history, literature, and the arts will all come into play. This multi-disciplinary talk will hopefully augment students' views of the world around them and spark interest in this dynamic field.

H94: Freakonomics: Using Economics to Explain Life Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andreia Fenley

We will explore how economics can tease out surprising correlations and causations in our day to day life. We will learn why shopping for jam can be so exhausting, how ice cream stores stay open in the winter, and more. This class will present fun-filled examples along with the science so students come out with a better appreciation of how economics can reveal mysteries in their high school lives and beyond.


Prerequisites
Just a savvy mind.

H29: Introduction to College-level Writing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elan Kugelmass

Mastered the five paragraph essay and ready for the next challenge? Get a taste of college writing and prepare yourself for advanced coursework. We'll focus on paper structure, thesis, motive, evidence, analysis, and plenty of other essential writing elements. Learn how to go beyond the five paragraph essay and express complex ideas effectively. Course is based on Princeton Writing Program pedagogy and taught by a student staff member.


Prerequisites
Strong writing ability, interest in writing, experience writing papers of at least 1,000 words.

H68: The Joys and Oddities of Meditation
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mary Gilstad

Taught by someone who has experienced Japanese Zen meditation in Kyoto and Ishikawa, Japan, and wants to bring some of the peculiarities of the practice to a wider audience, The Joys and Oddities of Meditation will allow students to experiment with meditation styles and learn the various aims of a practice that often gets either a mystical or "mental health-nut" image. The class will be conducted as a combination of experimental theatre workshop and language arts class. We will look at a few texts, write a bit, and, of course, "meditate."


Prerequisites
A genuine curiosity about meditation. Both experienced and inexperienced students welcome.

H125: Ideal vs. Practice: A Brief History of Pakistan
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rahul Subramanian

Covers the history of Pakistan since 1947, focusing on conceptions of Pakistani identity including the vision of founder Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the emergence of fundamentalist Islam, and some of the root causes behind military involvement in political affairs. Also touches on Pakistani foreign policy vis-a-vis India, the United States, and Afghanistan.


Prerequisites
Interest in current affairs/world history

H32: The Financial Crisis: What caused it and what have we learned?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Julian Dean

In 2007-8, the US financial system melted down and nearly sent the world economy into another Great Depression. How could this happen? Hadn't we learned from the past?

In response, the US government implemented a number of measures, such as the Dodd-Frank regulatory overhaul, to try prevent this happening again. Did they get it right this time? Could we see another meltdown?


Prerequisites
Some understanding of basic economics and US government institutions

H113: The Perfect Murder
Difficulty: **

This course will look into popular film noir and murder mystery movies from the 1930s-1960s in order to examine whether the "perfect murder" is actually possible.

H106: How to Tell a Story
Difficulty: **

We tell stories everyday. But how can we take our day-to-day conversations one step further and make them compelling? In this class, we'll talk about the art of crafting a narrative, whether it's a piece of journalism, a personal memoir, or a work of fiction.

H62: Unlocking the Graphic Novel
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Karis Schneider

"We're all puppets, Laurie. I'm just a puppet who can see the strings," says Dr. Manhattan in the graphic novel The Watchmen. Well, now you can see the strings holding the graphic novel together: time as space, "the gutter," the hyperreal - all of the techniques that graphic artists use that you've never known about until now. From the American Maus and the Watchmen to French bandes dessinees to Japanese manga, we'll see how to better understand and love the graphic novel.


Prerequisites
A desire to learn more about graphic novels! Bring in your favorite book and we'll take a look at it.

H104: Introduction to Farsi
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alex Smith

A brief introduction to the basics of Persian language (Farsi). We will learn the basics of both the written and oral components of the language. Learn how to find your way to the bathroom! And how to order the tastiest food at a Persian restaurant!

H20: From Les Misérables to "Les Miz": Victor Hugo in His World and Ours
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jessica Christy

What's the history behind the hit musical "Les Miz"? What message was Victor Hugo trying to send with his massive 1862 novel, and how has that message been interpreted over the last 150 years? And what "revolution" is that barricade trying to depict, anyway?

This lecture will introduce students to Victor Hugo's historical context and the political program of his greatest novel. After an overview of how his work has been adapted and re-adapted for stage and screen, students will have a chance to share their thoughts on why Les Misérables continues to speak to audiences around the world.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with "Les Miz" in at least one of its many forms is strongly recommended.

H98: Mock Trial for Girls: How to be a Fierce Lawyer
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andreia Fenley

Have you ever watched Drop Dead Diva and been inspired by the sharp legal arguments? Are you interested in history and law but been put asleep by technical and ancient legal applications? Have you done debate and mock trial and wished for snazzier topics to argue? If so, this is the class for you! We will learn how to apply legal rational to girly debate topics like the legality of banning pink hair in school, of People magazine, and whether girls should be taught with a different teaching style than boys. We will begin the class looking at some classic legal knowledge and then we will apply it to in-class debates!


Prerequisites
You have to be a girl! Also bring a fun spirit, a sharp mind, and get ready to have fun!

H107: What if?: alternate and counterfactual history
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Omar Rizwan

What if the Allies lost World War II? What if the South won the Civil War? (What if the Ming dynasty managed to industrialize China? What if the Mongols didn't destroy the Middle East's economic base?)

We'll explore some of the ideas and practice behind alternate history scenarios, look at a few 'timelines' created by hobbyists, some relevant books and games, and then work on making a scenario of our own.


Prerequisites
a fascination with history


Math & Computer Science

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M19: Irrational Ideas
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andy Loo

How many proofs can you give for the irrationality of $$\sqrt 2$$? Are there irrational powers of irrational numbers that are nonetheless rational? How much would you bet on the irrationality of $$\pi + e$$?

We'll explore the most irrational field of the most rational subject from its bloodstained discovery to its most contemporary mysteries.


Prerequisites
Know how to count

M65: What They Didn't Teach You in AP CS: Quick and Dirty Scripting with Python and the Bash Shell
Difficulty: **

Think cd is for playing music? Are your for loops fabulous and your if statements sublime, but you've never heard of ls, pwd, or scp? Come explore the world of programming outside of a Java IDE. We'll cover python scripting, a bit of bash, probably with with web scraping and JSON/API use thrown in.


Prerequisites
AP Computer Science or equivalent

M83: Hardcore Counting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elizabeth Yang

We'll look at cool combinatorics problems, counting in games, and counting things that are infinite.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of combinatorics

M37: Randomized Algorithms
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Andy Zhu

Sometimes we might be able to write down a nice procedure for solving a problem (for example, you may have heard before of the quicksort algorithm to solve the problem of sorting a list), but this procedure happens to fail or do poorly on certain specific inputs. How can we avoid such an issue? One way is to throw randomness into the equation!


Prerequisites
Probability

M91: How to Script Your Life!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Felix Sun

Use code to simplify your life! "Scripting" refers to writing short programs that automate common, repetitive tasks. Learn powerful life automation tools for fun and profit.

Topics MAY include (depending on time, student interest, and feasibility):
- Automatic emailing.
- Winning the Facebook poke war once and for all.
- Automatic presentation generation.


Prerequisites
A little knowledge of programming is required. You should know how to use for loops and if statements in at least one language. You need a Google account (aka gmail). Make one before coming to this class, if you do not have one already.

M131: Puzzles and Problem Solving Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Bieber

Join me for an hour of critical thinking, word play, and mathematical puzzles. Tackle puzzles with your mind, with pen and paper, and with programming. No prior programming or puzzling experience necessary. A healthy admiration for mathematics is encouraged.

M80: How Video Game Graphics Work
Difficulty: **

Modern video games can create amazingly lifelike characters and worlds. But have you ever wondered how they work behind the scenes? How a bunch of 1s and 0s turn into realistic-looking, even movie-like experiences?

In this class, you'll learn how 3D graphics in video games are generated and rendered. We'll start with 3D modelling and the basic rasterization pipeline, then discuss more advanced topics such as animation, antialiasing, graphics hardware, performance, and physical simulation of fluids, fog, and fire.


Prerequisites
Basic algebra. Physics and computer science may be helpful but are not necessary.

M59: Codes and Information Theory
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Evangelie Zachos

We'll talk a little bit about information theory (what is information? how can we measure information?) and then talk about error-correcting codes. We'll have lots of examples and even talk a little about the history of this mathematics.

M84: Introduction to git/GitHub
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Hansen Qian

How do YOU collaborate on code? Dropbox? Drop it. Come learn an awesome way track and share code with each other!

This course will teach you the basic concept of git, and basic ways to operate it!

(bad pun, I know.)


Prerequisites
Basic coding recommended, but not required. Computer recommended if you want to follow along with the installation. If you're Mac OS X, install HomeBrew before coming!

M71: All about Primes
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Sarah Trebat-Leder

“Prime numbers are what is left when you have taken all the patterns away. I think prime numbers are like life. They are very logical but you could never work out the rules, even if you spent all your time thinking about them.” (Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time)


Primes are very concrete and are the building blocks of the integers, but they are also incredibly complicated, and there is a lot that mathematicians don't know about them. This class won't focus on proving stuff about primes, but will instead be a brief overview of the field. I'll try to give you a sense of the kinds of questions mathematicians ask about primes, what is and isn't known about them, and what we expect to be true and why. First, we'll talk about prime factorization, the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, and generalizations of integers and primes. Then we'll talk about the distribution of the prime numbers and randomness. What's the probability that a randomly chosen integer is prime? What's the probabiity that a random prime is one more than a multiple of 5? Lastly, we'll talk about a few important open problems involving prime numbers, including the Riemann hypothesis, Goldbach's conjecture, and the twin prime conjecture.


Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites, but familiarity with at least some of the following would be useful: logarithms, imaginary numbers, basic probability, modular arithmetic, and infinite sums and products.

M25: May the Odds be Ever in Your Favor: Paradoxes in Probability
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Richard Zhang

Whether you are in the Hunger Games arena or just simply in math class, having a better sense of probability can go a long way. Learn how to tilt the chances in your favor and check out some brain-twisting probability paradoxes out there that could be useful to know.


Prerequisites
Basic notion of probability

M26: Modern Cryptography Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jennifer Tang

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Prerequisites
Decoding the course description is not required for taking the class. Interest in mathematics is preferred. Please be comfortable with exponents and logarithms.

M109: Lazy programming in Haskell
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Omar Rizwan

Sick of curly braces, classes, interfaces, methods, variables, and all that stuff from your typical imperative programming language? Haskell is a pure, non-strict, functional programming language which requires a totally different style of coding.

You might have to be "constantly clever," but your code will be way more expressive. You'll get to think in terms of definitions, instead of procedures. This class will provide an overview of Haskell and functional programming concepts, using examples.


Prerequisites
Some programming knowledge (Intro to Java or AP Computer Science or some prior experience in any language)

M61: Intro Programming with Java
Difficulty: **

Want to learn some programming basics? We'll be using Java to walk you through some introductory concepts. We'll also show you how to draw some basic graphics!

M58: A Zoo of Conic Sections
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Evangelie Zachos

Everyone's heard the name of the basic conic sections: circle, ellipse, hyperbola, and parabola. But why are they special? Where do they turn up? We'll take a windy path through many different areas of math to investigate them, seeing areas as diverse as the dynamics of a game of billiards to the amazing fact that five points in the plane determine a unique conic section.


Prerequisites
basic high school algebra

M89: How to Get from Point A to Point B
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aaron Schild

We will talk about graphs, the shortest path problem, and Dijkstra's algorithm for efficiently computing shortest paths. Time permitting, we will talk about other shortest path algorithms and related topics.

M102: The Limits of Computation
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Gaurav Singh

Can a computer tell if a program will stop? It turns out that there are some programs for which a computer cannot say if it will stop or run forever. We will show this, and then we will investigate other limits on the powers of a computer.


Prerequisites
A solid background in proof based mathematics.

M63: Glitch Art/Databending
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Stella

When computers malfunction sometimes data gets corrupted. This can show up in images (http://bit.ly/Ze5GnM) and audio (http://bit.ly/WCfHPL). In this class you'll use a picture of your choosing along with free software in order to create your very own glitch art.

M33: Security Problems in Voting Systems
Difficulty: *

Curious about the "email voting" hullabaloo after Hurricane Sandy? Did you know that people at Princeton have hacked New Jersey voting machines?
We'll examine different voting technologies throughout American history and discuss their security flaws (and other problems). We'll pay special attention to electronic voting machines (such as those used in New Jersey today). You'll get to "hack" different past voting systems and design a way to vote for a high school class government.


Prerequisites
None, but if you're bored by security or American history you might not want to take this course. If you're interested, take it - no background required!

M46: Group Field Rings
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Andrew Ardito

This course will be a introduction of sorts to Algebraic Number Theory.


Prerequisites
Some previous experience with fields (finite fields) rings, groups, and perhaps ideals. If you don't have all the prereqs you will still learn, but the end of the course will not make any sense.

M97: Probabilities of Five Card Poker Hands
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jim Tao

Derivation of the five card poker hand probabilities (single pair, two pairs, triple, full house, four of a kind, straight, flush, straight flush, royal flush, none of the above), with explanation.


Prerequisites
Ability to count

M103: The Mathematics of Magic Tricks
Difficulty: **

This course will cover various card tricks that are based on mathematical principles! Students will have the opportunity to learn and practice these card tricks, as well as learn about the beautiful mathematics behind them. Tricks will vary from the most basic Hummer Trick to mind-blowing, mind-reading card games! Brought to you by members of FRS174.


Prerequisites
Basic high school math.

M95: From the transistor to your laptop: How does a computer actually work? Full!
Difficulty: **

Did you ever think about what was going on inside your computer as you read this text? Are you at all appealed by circuit and all that stuff inside your laptop? Or do you just care about what will give you the most frames per second while playing Crysis on highest settings?

Well this talk is for you! I hope to cover the basics from how a transistor works with another transistor to slowly build up a full computer that lets you run all your favorite apps. Nothing is cooler than a computer, except know how a computer actually works!


Prerequisites
Have used a computer sometime in lifetime.


Science

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S119: Organic Chemistry, Part I
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Paul Rapoport

Welcome! We'll learn here some basic organic chemistry, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclo- s, alcohols, amines, and haloalkanes. We'll be looking into how to name them, and some interesting properties of them. This will move pretty fast, and assume knowledge of basic chemistry as a jumping-off point.


Prerequisites
Chemistry, preferably AP

S78: Conceptual Quantum Mechanics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aaron Kabcenell

Neils Bohr once said "Anyone not shocked by quantum mechanics has not yet understood it." Quantum mechanics is one of the most important subjects in physics, yet with its reliance on probability rather than certainty and the presence of oddities like half-alive cats, it is also vastly different from what we see around us every day. In this course, we will learn about how this world of the very, very, very small differs from the one that we know so well, to the point where even taking a measurement can become an ordeal! We will cover some of the major historical experiments and observations in the field, with a focus on the concepts and a minimum of mathematics, to learn why this field is so weird and fascinating.


Prerequisites
Having some familiarity with basic physics will be helpful, but is by no means required.

S105: Crash Course in Neuroscience--Why Study the Brain?
Difficulty: **

Why do we have a brain? And how can we even begin to think about studying it? Are the theories that have been established credible? In about an hour, we'll take a tour of the brain, discussing what we already know about its function, how we've gotten this far, and the work in the field that has yet to be completed.

S45: The Chemistry of Chocolate
Difficulty: **

As so many people's favorite treat, chocolate has a deliciously rich history spanning several millennia. Besides a sweet snack, chocolate is also a perfect example of many interesting scientific phenomena. In our class, we will learn about the molecules in chocolate, discuss how thermodynamics drives chocolate's creation, and calculate a recipe of own in the name of "hands-on research."


Prerequisites
Some exposure to introductory chemistry may be helpful.

S21: Fun with Quantum Computation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Abraham Asfaw

We'll describe quantum circuitry in this course without the need to understand the intricacies involved in the quantum physics that underlies their operation. No knowledge of Quantum Mechanics or Linear Algebra is assumed, and we'll cover all basics as needed.


Prerequisites
No knowledge of Quantum Mechanics or Linear Algebra is assumed, and we'll cover all basics as needed.

S120: Organic Chemistry, Part II
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Paul Rapoport

NOTE: You MUST have taken Part I of this course to take this.
Welcome back! We'll be going into some of the more complicated aspects of organic chemistry here, including the naming of carbonyls (ketones and aldehydes), imines, (ketimines and aldimines), aromaticity, and basic acid/base and nucleophilic reactions. If we have time, we might go into some biochemistry, and how to think like a chemist, too.


Prerequisites
Organic Chemistry, Part I

S73: Whirlwind Tour of the Universe
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Cody O'Neil

This course will take students from the tiny terrestrial rock they call home through to the farthest reaches of space-time, and everything in between! Topics touched on include planetary and star formation, galaxies, black holes, extra dimensions, extraterrestrial life, and the birth and death of the Universe. All in a single session!


Prerequisites
This course assumes no prior knowledge of astronomy or any other science. Open to burgeoning barbers and astronauts alike!

S115: Artificial Intelligence and the Brain Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kevin Miller

One major goal of modern neuroscience is to understand how the brain processes information - that is, to discover the algorithms of the mind. In this class, we'll talk about some of the progress that has been made, and how algorithms developed by computer scientists interested in Artificial Intelligence have found an unexpected home in the brain.


Prerequisites
Algebra

S72: Tackling Climate Change: Play the Game!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Geeta Persad

How much do you know climate change? Do you know what causes it? Have you ever thought about ways we can combat it?

Come learn about the science of climate change, and the technologies and strategies that have been developed to tackle it! Then partner with other students to come up with your team's own strategy for combatting climate change, and go head to head with other teams to defend your solutions!

S57: The Science Behind the Low-Carb Diet
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Julia Hu

Fad dieting is a phenomenon of the First World, where all kinds of methods are employed to try to lose weight, from low calorie to low carb diets, magic pills to exotic fruits. In this class, we'll examine the low-carb diet from a metabolic point of view, and why it may be the diet that actually works.

S129: Botany!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Martin! Wolf

Come join us and study the amazing world of plants! Princeton has a great variety of both natural and cultivated flora, from indigenous wildflowers to our very own "Fossil Tree!" If the weather's nice, we'll take a stroll through campus looking, (and of course, smelling!) at the more interesting species that surround us.

S82: Bioengineering: Harnessing the Power of Nature
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yan Wu, Michelle Wu

Nature has evolved organisms and biomolecules that are really, really good at doing some pretty awesome things. There are enzymes that can catalyze reactions hundreds of times faster than man made catalysts and bacteria that can break down the most toxic chemicals. This class will cover how we harness these biomolecules to use in our daily lives.


Prerequisites
A basic understanding of chemistry and biology

S74: Introduction to Fusion Energy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Schwartz

What is fusion energy? One of the great challenges of the 21st century will be finding sources of clean and plentiful energy to power our society. By smashing atoms together in the same sort of reactions that power the Sun, fusion power promises energy with no greenhouse gas emissions, that doesn't use large areas of land, doesn't create high levels of radioactive waste, and has enough fuel for tens of thousands of years.

Learn the basics of the science behind nuclear fusion energy and about current research and progress toward a working fusion power plant.


Prerequisites
Be familiar with the components of atoms - protons, neutrons, and electrons.

S64: The Visual System: How We Make Sense of What We See
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ryan Ly

An overview of what neuroscience knows about the primate visual system, from the retina to higher-order visual cortex. I will also present various visual illusions and demos to drive home the idea that what we perceive is not always reality.


Miscellaneous

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X112: Bees 101
Difficulty: *

An introduction to honey bees and beekeeping taught by members of the Princeton BEE Team.

This class will expose you to the life cycle of a hive, how beekeepers produce honey, and some of the current research on group decision making in honey bee swarms.

X130: Kung Fu
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Julia Yan

No experience is necessary! If a panda can master kung fu, then so can you :) We'll try to cover a wide range of styles (crane, tiger, monkey, etc.) and techniques (blocking, grappling).

X100: Learning Japanese with Anime Music
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elaine Chou

An introduction to Japanese, with examples of grammar points, vocabulary, and phrases from songs in anime.

X122: Everything You Wanted to Know About Hangul But Were Afraid to Ask
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Paul Rapoport

Annyeonghaseyo! Eoseo oshipshiyo! We'll learn here about hangul, the Korean script, legendarily known as "so easy a wise man can learn it in an afternoon, and even a fool can learn it in a week". If we have enough time, we might go into some very basic Korean phrases. Please bring pencils/pens and paper with you: you'll get to write, too!


Prerequisites
None

X67: Talking to Strangers Full!
Difficulty: *

Find yourself freezing up in social situations? Consider yourself self-conscious or an introvert? We'll fix that! We'll start with some instruction, then practice our newfound skills. If the weather's nice, we'll have a large practical component.

X38: Cooking Basics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nikhil Deshmukh

Students will learn basic knife skills, different methods of heat application, and the theory behind seasoning and balancing flavors all while cooking a dish from scratch!

X17: Introduction to Capital Markets
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alex Daifotis

What is the stock market? How does it work? What are bonds? What are derivatives? How do we make sense of the plethora of financial instruments now available. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of capital markets. They will learn a brief history, why they exist, and how they currently function.


Prerequisites
None

X101: How to Build Your Own Computer
Difficulty: **

Apple, HP, Dell, Gateway, Asus, and all the other computer manufacturers have one thing in common: they make A LOT of money from people believing that computers are hard to build. Spoiler alert: they're not.

This class will show you what it takes to build your own desktop computer. Buying components and assembling your own computer enables you to save hundreds of dollars on a basic machine, put together the ultimate gaming rig, or whatever else you want -- the point is that you are empowered to put exactly what you want in your computer.

We'll cover what the components of a computer are (motherboard, processor, graphics card, hard drive, case, etc.), how to compare components and pick out what you want, how they all work together, and what resources you have available to you on your journey.

Rather than asking your parents for a new computer for the holidays/your birthday, ask for funding on building a computer of your own! Take this class if that sounds like a cool plan, or you just want to learn more about what it would take.

X70: Play-doh, Goo, and Conversation
Difficulty: *

We'll make play-doh on the stove and play with it while it's still hot. We'll also make goo out of cornstarch and water. And we'll probably talk to each other, because otherwise that would be awkward...

X81: How to Be a Good Person
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mark Benjamin

Everyone wants to be a good person, and we all have some elusive idea of what this means. In this short class we'll try to understand what traits good people have, as well as determining things you can do in your own life to become a better person.

Disclaimer: Although I like to think I am a good person, I am not pretentious enough to make this a class about me. Instead, it's a chance to break down what other people think makes someone a good person.