Princeton Splash
Welcome to Princeton Splash, a student-run organization at Princeton University

Splash Spring 16
Course Catalog

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Arts Engineering
Humanities Math & Computer Science
Science Miscellaneous


Arts

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A338: Cranes, Crocodiles, Boxes, and Boats: Origami for the Curious
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Stephen Chen

Interested in paper folding?

If so, great! If not, never fear!

Whether you make paper airplanes for a living or are afraid of getting paper cuts, this is the class will let you fold the most impressive origami models to show all your friends.

This hand-on experience is easy for anyone to learn and will give you something to do with your left over notebook paper, homework assignments, and tests.


Prerequisites
Two hands and a brain.

A326: Improv 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jessica Quinter

Learn the basics of improv with Princeton's self-proclaimed most attractive improv comedy group, Fuzzy Dice! This course will include the basics of scenes, characters and YES, AND!

A329: Improv Comedy 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Cooper

Learn the basics of comedy improv and play some fun games in a low-pressure, beginner-friendly environment with Princeton's Lobster Club Improv Comedy!

A340: Revamp Your T-Shirit
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Angela Paoletta

Have you accumulated a collection of boring t-shirts that you rarely ever wear? Do you want to learn how to alter the fabric into something totally new and of your own creation? This class will teach you the basics of t-shirt reconstruction, which involves using scissors, stretching, tying, and whatever else you might think of to turn a plain t-shirt into something stylish (no sewing necessary). With creativity and curiosity, the t-shirt designs are endless!

A316: From Delacroix to la Belle Époque: European Art in the 19th Century
Difficulty: *

The long 19th Century (1789-1914) saw Europe change fundamentally, forever. Revolution, Industrialization, Imperialism and the advent of Modernity changed the course of life in the Old World, and these groundbreaking events define the terms in which we think about creativity and beauty to this day.
This course provides a panorama of the historical contexts and artistic insights that defined the key aesthetic paradigms of 19th Century Europe, focusing on visual art and painting. We will discuss Romanticism, Symbolism, Realism, Impressionism, and the early Modernism that would meander into the revolution orchestrated by Picasso, Matisse, and others in the early 20th Century.

A366: Architecture 101 Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Pelin Asa

We will talk about what goes into the design of the buildings around us as we cover the masterpieces of the world architecture history. We will also go on a short tour around the campus to explore Princeton's wide range of buildings from Gothic to modern.

A319: The Basics of Esperanto Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Avaneesh Narla

Esperanto, created by Dr. Zamenhof in 1887, is the most widely spoken constructed international auxiliary language. Created as an easy-to-learn, politically neutral language, now it has almost two million speakers. The course will explore the basics of the language, and expose students to Esperanto culture and history.


Engineering

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E320: How to make electronics: From currents to systems
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anqi Dong

Have you ever wondered how your computer turns cat videos on YouTube into images that appear on your screen? Or how that video can be sent over from the Internet in the first place? Why does playing a video on a computer make it work so much harder than reading emails on it? Come to think of it, how does your computer know how to run programs at all, and an infinite number to boot?

In this class, we'll look at computers function, starting from the level of transistors and logic gates, and understanding how those basic building blocks are used to work up to actual "high-level" programs that we use on a day-to-day basis. We'll also look briefly at what sorts of things can make a computer not work.


Prerequisites
Be aware of what Boolean logic is (please try to look it up if you're unsure). Some algebra, computer science, and physics background would be helpful, but is not required.

E385: Hands-On Electrical Engineering:Components and Tools Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Gordon

Try this light-on-math introduction to working in an Electrical Engineering Lab! Students will be introduced to the concepts of potential, current, resistance, capacitance, and transistors as switches. We will then take advantage of Princeton's Electrical Engineering Lab to learn how to use breadboards, power supplies, multimeters, oscilloscopes, and the soldering iron. Walk out of the room with your very own working circuit!


Prerequisites
Comfortable with algebra. Must be comfortable handling a hot object.

E360: Computers at a Low Level
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: William Navarre

This course will be a fast paced overview about how computers work at the hardware level. We will briefly discuss logic gates and basic processor control flow.

The course will move very quickly, so you might get lost; given the nature of the subject, however, I expect you'll still get a lot out of the course.


Prerequisites
Minimal programming experience (you should have written some program that has functions, methods, GOTOs, for loops, or while loops). Some understanding of logic. Basically good understanding of the terms AND, OR, NOT. You should understand the following definition of XOR, though you do not need to have known it already: (A XOR B) = (A OR B) AND NOT (A AND B).

E372: Circuits and Microprocessors 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tony Jin

Build circuits, and learn how they work! We will be making our own electric instruments, and programming Arduino to play current pop songs. Scary name, but a beginner-friendly course.

E353: Visual Programming 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Akash Levy

Have you ever played a computer game and wondered, "How does that work? Could I make beautiful graphics like that?"

Well it turns out the answer is yes! In this course, we will use Processing, a programming language based on Java, to develop graphics and understand what it takes to make a video game using these ideas.

No prior experience is required! If you have prior experience, you are still welcome to join the class--you will work on a more advanced project!

We will start with the basics of how a programming language works: variables, syntax, functions. After this, we will learn about Processing and how you can use it to make graphics appear on your screen. Then we will talk about how to make these graphics work in such a way that they can do whatever you want them to (in this case, become a video game).

We will move quickly through all the concepts required to do programming. The class will be fun and interactive. We will begin with a presentation, and then we will work in groups of two to build our very own games!

This class is co-sponsored by the IEEE Society of Princeton


Prerequisites
None! (We may go a bit fast for a beginner to programming, but it should be doable)

E383: Building Computers Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jessica Li, Weimen Li

This course is about the practicals of assembling your own desktop computer, with components that you can purchase off popular retailers like Amazon or Newegg. We will go over the essential components of a desktop computer, including the motherboard, power supply, RAM, CPU, storage elements, and the case; we will then delve into how to select components that fit your budget and your requirements, including interfaces such and trade-offs between different variations of components.

The presentation is technical, but students of any age can understand how to build computers - I built my first when I was 13.


Humanities

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H347: American Sign Language Literature and Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Colin Lualdi

Did you know that American Sign Language has a rich literary heritage spanning hundreds of years? This class is your opportunity to discover ASL literature in the form of storytelling, folktales, and poetry. Literature examples will be presented for discussion. Class participants will learn the key elements of ASL literature, and have the opportunity to develop their own ASL handshape poems under the guidance of a Deaf instructor fluent in ASL. No prior ASL knowledge required!

H350: The Two Lenses: Adhering to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights While Maintaining Cultural Values
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Julien Rosenbloom

The “Two Lenses” lecture examines the relationship between the cultural aspect and ethical aspect to human rights law and the general notion of human rights, which make up the two lenses by which human rights violations and measures of adherence to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 are evaluated. It considers a wide range of case studies in such countries as Malawi, Sudan, Liberia, and the like; in such revolutions as South Sudan’s (and its ensuing civil war), Haiti’s, Latin America’s, the Arab Spring, and the United States’; and in such practices as genital mutilation (especially in females), early and arranged marriages, chiefdom, and religious rites; and challenges the students to think critically about the lens with which these are typically associated and evaluate these associations. Transitory instances of human rights violations and adherences will also be discussed. An overlying theme that will be frequently synthesized into case studies and concept discussions is the role of westernization and the westernization of human rights as a whole. Within this framework, students will leave with a broadened understanding of human rights and current events and be able to utilize the case studies and concepts as catalysts for discussion and debate in the future.


Prerequisites
A background in world history may prove helpful in contributing to and engaging in discussion, though it is certainly not required.

H324: Philosophy as a Way of Life Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Duc Nguyen

Many people regard philosophy as an irrelevant enterprise to modern life, reserved only for those individuals with their heads too far in the clouds and too much free time. Modern academic philosophers, with their large emphasis on the production of ideas intended only for their fellow academic philosophers, can often seem far removed from everyday life. More than two thousand years ago, however, in both the East and the West, philosophers were not concerned with producing complex arguments only among themselves, but instead were primarily interested in the attainment of truth and wisdom for the purpose of instigating a transformation of both themselves and their lives. As French philosopher Pierre Hadot once commented, modern philosophers are artists of reason, but ancient philosophers were artists of life. In this primer course in philosophy, we will investigate the principle ideas of some of the world’s most influential philosophers, ancient, pre-modern, and modern, as we attempt to construct how their philosophies may offer us guidance and solace as we attempt to live in the modern world.

H355: Eht Seitinamuh Ecneuqes
Difficulty: **

Why do we study the past? How do artists find inspiration? When did the Renaissance actually begin? And how do people respond to devastating social upheaval and strife?
To answer these questions, we'll focus in on the early Crusades through the beginning of the Renaissance, examining some of the landmark figures (like Pope Urban II), artworks, and texts (like Dante's Divina Commedia) of the time. Unisciti a noi "nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita!"


Prerequisites
All you need is an interest in the humanities! (Don't feel put out if you want to pursue STEM, the teachers are in the same boat as you!) Some experience in close textual/visual analysis would be helpful.

H322: Who wrote the Gospels in the Bible? A Historical and Literary Approach
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Soonho Kwon

The first four books of the Bible, called the "Gospels" according to Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, form an essential source for Christians to study, fundamentally shaping Christian views and doctrines of God and Jesus. Yet who actually wrote these documents, and when/where did they come from? Was there a historical "Matthew" who wrote "the Gospel According to Matthew"? Who might "Luke" be writing to? Join us as we investigate the historicity of these books from a historical and literary perspective. We will be engaged in a "critical" discussion, in that we will put aside our various theological considerations and approach these texts objectively, to try to understand what was going on as the books were being written or formed. The "answer" may or may not surprise you!


Prerequisites
Knowing about the Gospels would be helpful but not necessary.

H318: That Flawless Formation: Intersectional Feminism in Modern Culture
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: David Guirgis

“That Flawless Formation” is a multifaceted lecture and discussion examining the complicated intersections of race, gender, sexual orientation, and inequality through the lens of today’s popular culture and points of conversation. This course aims to explore the meaning of intersectionality in regards to feminism and equality as a whole, with respect to current events. We'll be exploring the definition and central ideas behind intersectional feminism through the lenses of Beyoncé (if the title didn't already give that away!) as well as other news and culture events ranging from #BlackLivesMatter to Caitlyn Jenner.


Prerequisites
None.

H328: Who was the Historical Jesus?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Soonho Kwon

Jesus, a prominent figure in several religions and the central figure in Christianity, is surprisingly barely mentioned in non-Christian sources from his time. And, while the Christian sources (like the Bible) describe a lot of Jesus' teachings, they reveal little to no biographical information. So who exactly was Jesus, from a historical perspective? Was he indeed a miracle-worker as noted in Biblical passages? Or, could they be the result of later editorial changes, "making" Jesus into God? Of course we won't arrive at "the answer," but join us as we talk about some of the major schools of thought on the historical Jesus! You may be surprised by the other hypotheses out there.


Prerequisites
Any knowledge of Jesus would be helpful but not required.

H346: Opinions on Urban Planning and Sense of Space Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: William Navarre

An informal and discussion-based course, we will discuss our opinions on urban planning and urban design.

The major focus will be on sense of place, suburbanization, and accompanying history.


Prerequisites
None

H357: Journalism 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Maya Wesby

Meet with members of The Daily Princetonian staff to get a crash-course on the ins and outs of journalism! Learn what it takes to pitch a story, the reporting and editorial process, how to make your piece go viral, and much more. Come get a taste of an exciting and evolving industry!

H365: How Will The World End? a discussion and debate Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Shea Minter

This course will be a brief introduction to the causes of war and some basic international relations theory, then will end with an informal discussion/debate about conflicting theories. Do nuclear weapons deter or provoke conflict? How big of a role does ideology play in war? Do international institutions work at all? You'll answer these questions yourself, and come up with your own theory on how the world will end.


Math & Computer Science

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M343: How to Construct a 17-gon
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Heather Newman

Compass-and-straightedge constructions are geometric constructions that can be made with merely an unmarked ruler and a compass. Gauss proved in 1796 that a 17-gon is constructible under these constraints. In this class, we will look at why we can construct a 17-gon but not, say, a 7-gon. Not only will we prove that the 17-gon is constructible, but we will learn a slick and clever way of actually constructing it. The derivation of the construction will make use of some seemingly unrelated concepts, such as imaginary numbers, which I hope will spark an appreciation for the beauty and artistry of mathematics.


Prerequisites
Standard knowledge of geometry and trigonometry is expected.

M351: Probability Puzzles
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Felix Xiao

If you flip a fair coin many times, are you more likely to see a sequence of HHT or HTT first? If you cut a string at two points uniformly at random, what is the probability the three pieces can form a triangle?
Learn how to solve puzzles like these using the basic concepts of probability: random variables, expectation, conditioning, and Bayes theorem.


Prerequisites
Elementary algebra. Some knowledge of calculus may be helpful.

M358: Advanced mathematical riddles
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Samuel Marks

Riddles are often a great way to stretch your problem solving abilities while introducing you to new areas of math. In this class, we will look at a sampling of difficult mathematical riddles that form bridges into topics like countability, constructions of the real numbers, the hamming code, and the axiom of choice.


Prerequisites
Some background in mathematical problem solving

M381: Hands-on game theory Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Holden Lee

In this class you'll play some "games" with simple rules but counter-intuitive strategies and outcomes. Win a dollar... or not. You'll learn how these simple games are the beginnings of game theory, a branch of applied mathematics that arose in the 1900's and has had profound implications for diverse fields such as economics, psychology, and evolutionary biology.


Prerequisites
Basic algebra and probability

M352: Finite Sums
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Herrera

The class will be on finite sums. The goal is to develop some of the tools of "finite calculus"/"discrete calculus" which is a very elementary (meaning that you kinda just need to know algebra to do it) method of calculating sums.
First, we will discuss sequences and finite sums with sigma notation. Then we will go over the discrete derivative and discuss the relationship between it and finite summation which is basically the discrete integral. Then we will discuss induction and calculate a few sums using induction and the "standard tricks" that one learns in high school for calculating the arithmetic or geometric series. Then we will look at these calculations from the viewpoint of discrete calculus, discuss how to calculate the series $$\sum_{k=1}^{n}k^\ell$$ for any integral $$\ell \geq 1$$ and prove that the series of any polynomial is another polynomial whose leading term (the term with the highest degree) is easy to calculate.

My goals for this is for it to be interesting and accessible for high school level students yet pushing toward some of the skills used in proof-based college level math courses.


Prerequisites
An understanding of the fundamentals of algebra (manipulating expressions/equations, solving for "x", familiarity with variables, functions, and equations, and reasoning in a mathematical sense) is really all that is technically needed. It would be more reasonable if there was a familiarity with algebra II or precalculus material, though for the most part that would only be so that one is familiar with algebra. Having seen sequences and series of arithmetic and/or geometric sequences is great and some idea of calculus would be amazing. I will poll the class and see if there is anyone who has not seen calculus since there are many nice analogues between "normal" calculus and discrete calculus and I would like to mention them if it is not confusing, though knowing or having even seen normal calculus is not required or expected. Also, having seen proofs or rigorous computations (like showing that the vertex of a parabola is $$-b/(2a)$$, calculation of the quadratic formula, proofs be induction, etc.) would help with feeling familiar with what is going to be presented, though, again, not necessary.

M334: Basics of Probability
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Christopher Zhang

Topics in probability to be decided. Topics may include: Kolmogorov's axioms, central limit theorem, Markov chains.


Prerequisites
Calculus is a pre-requisite.

M369: Introduction to Modern Algebra
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Arnav Sood

Modern algebra is a fascinating field (if you're new to it, that's a pun you'll understand after taking the course!) which studies what are called algebraic structures, or sets endowed with certain operations. This class is an introduction to those structures, specifically groups, rings, and a special type of ring called a field, with an emphasis on group theory and polynomial applications. The emphases are flexible, though.


Prerequisites
"Mathematical maturity." Experience writing proofs would be good. Modern algebra is relatively self-contained, but the course is designed for prospective math majors in college who want to get a sense for what algebra is and what algebraic problems look like. Competition math experience is by no means a requirement (I sucked at it when I was in high school), but if you're good at it it might make the class flow easier.

M317: Computer Security Taught Through Offensive Measures Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Henry Birge-Lee

Learn computer security by learning some of the basic tools, techniques, and vulnerabilities that are exploited to attack systems. Computer Security is a rapidly growing and interesting field, and with more and more devices connected, protecting information systems is more important than ever before. Learning defensive computer security is useful, but it is also important to understand the types of attacks these defensive measures are designed to prevent. Being able to carry out an attack gives someone a true idea of what an attack is capable of and the subtleties of how an attack works. This is a hands on lab that will teach the following security concepts and the attacks that make them necessary:
Assume public computers are compromised: Ways to gain admin access to a computer
Never type your password on a computer that you don’t know is secure: How key loggers can steal passwords
Do not use secure passwords for computer user account login (and in general do not use the same password more than once): Recovering plain text passwords from windows machines
Do not type passwords into sites that are not HTTPs: Network monitoring with wire shark
Keep your software up to date: Server Service Vulnerability (documented by MS08-067, CVE-2008-4250)
This class is in the form of a hands on lab where all students will be able to try these different attacks against test systems. In addition to teaching good security, this class serves as an intro to penetration testing (and you will learn what MS08-067 means).


Prerequisites
Ideally everybody would know something about how networks and operating systems work. This tends to go with programming experience but is not the same.

M354: The Mathematics behind Magic
Difficulty: *

Have you always wondered how magicians pull off amazing card tricks? You'd be surprised by just how many tricks rely on mathematics and not slight of hand. We'll teach you the math and the magic you need to dazzle your friends using only your mind and a deck of cards.
Bring your mind and a DECK OF CARDS please!


Prerequisites
Basic mathematical skills

M373: Game programming with Elm
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Holden Lee

I'll introduce the basics of functional reactive programming - a new programming paradigm that combines the mathematical elegance of functions with effective signal handling to make programming games (and much more) clean and efficient. (In fact, Elm has been called the "happiest" programming language.*) Then you'll spend the rest of the time designing and implementing your own games, and I'll be on hand to assist throughout the process.

Come with ideas! See some examples at http://elm-lang.org/

*Reference: http://bit.ly/1BDFJFX

(Note: please do not come for just the second half.)

M382: Permutations Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Frederic Koehler

The teacher will teach something interesting about permutations, which are "shufflings" of a set, e.g. a pack of cards. They are pretty important in math, computer science, life, everything. If time permits, some things about the Robinson-Schensted correspondence will be taught. (Don't worry what this is.)


Prerequisites
No real technical requirements (definitely no calculus, trigonometry, etc!) --- just willingness to appreciate new mathematics.


Science

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S327: Symmetry and Noether's Theorem: The Most Beautiful Idea in Physics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rajeev Erramilli

Our understanding of the universe is often described by various conservation laws: the conservation of energy, the conservation of momentum, etc. At first glance, it doesn't seem like these ideas are related by any means. But Emmy Noether proved that conservation laws arise from the deeper idea of symmetries. I'll discuss symmetries in the context of physics and conceptually derive Noether's theorem, as well as explain its significance and application.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with calculus and physics would be helpful.

S335: Cosmology: What is the Universe made of? Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: BORYANA HADZHIYSKA

What is our current understanding of the main components of the Universe? Do we have evidence for the existence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy? And what are they in the first place? Other topics included will be the expansion of the Universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background (or as people like to call it "the baby picture of the Universe"), the recent discovery of gravitational waves and black holes.


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of physics gravitational laws and some calculus

S376: Introduction to Meteorology and Weather Forecasting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jonathan Lin, Paul Yi

Have you ever wondered about the science behind storm forecasts? Are you an aspiring meteorologist? In this course, we will discuss ingredients that make up a healthy storm and walk through how to make sense of meteorological maps.

S374: The Postulates of Quantum Mechanics Full!
Difficulty: **

Want to learn more about the wacky world of quantum mechanics? Want to finally understand what Schrodinger's Cat is? Come learn about the basic postulates that rule the world where all classical rules of physics break down.

S341: Brainwaves: the Neuroscience of Making and Appreciating Music Full!
Difficulty: **

Why do we enjoy music? What makes music so emotionally powerful? What drives us to make and listen to music? In this course on the neuroscience of music, we will discuss how the physical properties of sound are translated into signals in the brain, how the brain perceives the higher-level information -- including rhythm and melody -- that makes a sequence of sound "music", and lastly, how music affects our daily lives.


Prerequisites
Excitement for learning!

S363: Science of Makeup Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Wing Fei Wong

Looking your best is art, but it's also science. It's ingrained in us: ancient Egyptians pioneered the use of eyeliner, perfumes, body oils and paints over 4,000 years ago. Our modern equivalents are enough to make entire business empires, be it from the actual products to the Instagram models who purchase them.

But why do we feel the need to put pigments on our face? And, more importantly, what exactly are we putting on it? This course aims to get down to the science of it:

1. What does "good" makeup try to mimic? Is there a science behind beauty trends?
2. What goes into a beauty product? The chemicals, dyes, and preservatives in all their (Good? Bad?) glory.
3. How are these things tested and approved? Think of the bunnies!


Prerequisites
None

S362: Virology Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Wing Fei Wong

Humans have only known about viruses since the late 19th century, but we share an intimate relationship with them going back to ancient times and distant eras. They're the bringers of disease and death, but they also give us beautiful patterns in tulips, help us fight off bacterial infection, and co-exist with us in our tissues, cells and even DNA. The goal for this course is to gain some level of understanding of them:

1. What are viruses? What makes them special?
2. Why do some viruses (like rabies and Ebola), cause horrific disease, while others (like the common cold and chicken pox) are just minor and annoying?
3. How do humans defend against them? Why do we have vaccines for only a limited number of viruses? Where are the drugs?

Viruses are the focus, but we will touch upon virus-like things like viroids and prions!


Prerequisites
Background in biology is preferable but not mandatory

S370: Introduction to Thinking (Machines) Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Arnav Sood

The notion of the thinking machine has captured the collective fascination since Turing wrote his seminal paper, but what, exactly, does "thinking" mean, and what does machine thought entail for human thought? And what do modern phenomena --- such as machine victories in chess, checkers, or Go --- mean for it?

This class studies machine thought (and some hypotheses on human thought), with a focus on several classical philosophical objects (thought experiments, definitions, etc.). These include Block's blockhead, Davidson's swampman, some of Dennett's intuition pumps, and the Turing Test.


Prerequisites
No specific body of knowledge is required. Since we'll be defining all the necessary objects in class, all that's required is an inquisitive mind and a willingness to dissect arguments.

S375: Models, Drugs, and Protein: How we can use computers to fight disease Full!
Difficulty: ***

Computers are increasingly enhancing our understanding of biological systems. We will go over the basics of molecular simulation and see how we can use these concepts to understand the possible molecular basis for diseases like Alzheimer's and Huntington's, as well as design novel therapeutics.

Our course will aim to answer 3 main questions:

1. How can we model atoms and their interactions? We will begin with a simple system of particles and see how simulations give us physically meaningful information.
2. How do we simulate protein folding and model protein structure? The small-scale interactions we build an understanding of will allow us to tackle problems in the larger realm of biology. For instance, diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's likely originate from the misfolding of otherwise normal proteins.
3. How do we design better drugs? Knowing information about protein structure and folding allows us to design drugs of better specificity and efficacy.

Contributions in modeling have allowed us to gain tremendous clarity in tackling complex biological problems, and as computers become faster and smarter, the science is only going to get more exciting.


Prerequisites
Basic physics, biology and chemistry

S380: CSI: New Jersey
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Stephanie Diu

Come learn about basic forensics with a focus on forensic pathology! Do medical examiners / forensic pathologists really do all the stuff you've seen on CSI, Law & Order and Bones? How do you determine cause of death and what's it really like examining a body?

S325: Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness and a Fulfilled Life Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Duc Nguyen

For much of its relatively short history, the psychological sciences have been heavily focused on what is wrong with people, from Sigmund Freud’s ideas of mental disorders to Stanley Milgram’s obedience studies. Then emerged positive psychology, which began to use the scientific method to systematically study the “well-lived life” and how people can use this understanding to achieve happiness and satisfaction. Now, positive psychology is a thriving and exciting new branch of psychology with almost immediate implications for how we live, act, and think. As a primer for the new field, this course will explore how scientists define and study happiness and satisfaction, some of the not-so-surprising and surprising findings so far, and how we can incorporate some of these ideas and theories into our own lives.

S361: Brain Day Full!
Difficulty: *

Are you a neuroscientist in the making? Whether or not you answer yes to this question, Brain Day is the perfect class to get an insider's look on the brain and how it works. Students will get to practice brain dissections on real sheep brains in order to learn some of the fundamentals of neuroscience and brain anatomy.


Prerequisites
Able to stomach dissections and the smell of chemical preservations


Miscellaneous

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X368: Jeopardy! 101 Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Terry O'Shea

Come learn the ins and outs of America's favorite game show--all are welcome!

We'll go over the highlights of Jeopardy! history and strategy and what it's like to be on the show. Then students will compete in a few fun, low-stakes mock rounds.

Taught by 2014 College Championship winner Terry O'Shea.

X333: Applied Game Theory Full!
Difficulty: *

If you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours, but if you get too comfortable, I may have to take you down a notch. Come play a game! We will try to accommodate for various levels of experience.


Prerequisites
Some experience playing board and/or card games recommended.

X342: Competitive Pokémon Battling & Breeding
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rita Fang

You've beaten all eight gyms, trounced the Elite Four, and made yourself known as the new Pokémon League Champion in the games... But do you want to take Pokémon skills to the next level? Then this course is the one for you! We'll be introducing you to the world of competitive Pokémon battling, where you'll learn about tiers, teams, and trade-offs. After all, you aren't in Kanto anymore; you don't have any potions to bring your Pokémon out of the red after a bad play. All you have are strategy, wits, and a little bit of luck.


Prerequisites
A basic knowledge of Pokémon, preferably up to at least the fourth generation (Pokémon Diamond/Pearl/Platinum/Heart Gold/Soul Silver).

X379: Travel the USA
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lori Trojak

From seeing whales and the Aurora Borealis, to getting caught in a canyon thunder storm, visiting a Dude Ranch, swimming with 150 year old turtles, black and green sand beaches, astronomical sights and many other wonders this country's landscape (water and sky) hold. This class will be part slide show. I've traveled the country in RV, plane, train, and other ways and spent over a year and half in free travel. Bring your questions.


Prerequisites
A sense of adventure:)

X384: Rock Climbing 101 Section #2 Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nathaniel Cope

The world exists in three dimensions - why are you only moving in two of them? Come to the Princeton University Outdoor Action Rock Wall on Splash Day for a adventure-filled introduction to one of the greatest sports in the world, taught by real Princeton students and rock climbers! First, you'll learn safety knots, terminology, and how to belay - then, you'll take on the Wall itself, climbing over thirty feet under any one of our thirteen sections of Wall! Challenge is all by choice - no one will be forced to climb higher than they want to! Guys, girls, and other-gendered beings of all ages are welcome for either of two three-hour sections of music, climbing, and all-around fun! Never touched a wall before or been climbing since birth, guaranteed we have something for you! Bring your friends, bring your enemies, bring yourself - CLIMB FOREVER!

[This section is only two hours, whereas the other one is three - Splash is only so long, after all. There'll be less overall time to learn and climb in this one, but it'll still be great!]


Prerequisites
1. Yourself 2. A willingness to try something new! 3. Basically nothing else! We provide all the harnesses, shoes, carabiners and such free of charge! (pants/leggings/garments that cover the knees are recommended - people tend to scrape their knees against the wall as they climb otherwise)

X378: Time to Tap Dance
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lori Trojak

An hour is hardly enough time to learn a whole dance genre but I can teach you enough to get you through an audition of the basic moves and if you practice, you can continue to learn enough to actually piece the steps together to do an entire dance. This is a class about the basic steps and putting them together to perform the #1 dance move in all auditions.


Prerequisites
Bring shoes without a rubber sole if possible. Sneakers will slow you down but will work if necessary.

X330: Juggling 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: John Van Orden

Learn to juggle with the Princeton juggling Club! All levels welcome!!


Prerequisites
N/A

X336: Hype 101: Don't let your Memes be Dreams; Turning the Ridiculous into the Mundane Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ben Dobkin

Ideas spread like wildfire given the current coverage of both mass and social media. However, no one can predict what will or will not become viral. This course will first consider how do people chose which ideas to viralize and what makes them appropriate for the job. Then we will go over the theories that dictate and estimate the progression from an idea to an establishment, including the importance of social ties in influence networks, the cascade effect, and the presence of public figures in networks. Whether it be something well-meaning like the Ice Bucket Challenge or purposefully ridiculous like Rickrolling, all ideas require this hype. So get hyped to learn about the process which takes an idea you can dream of and puts it in the homes and minds of every consumer.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of Internet culture is desired, but not necessary.

X323: How Chocolate is Made: From Bean to Bar with the Institute for Chocolate Studies
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kate Letai

Have you ever wondered how chocolate is made? Find out how the beans of the cocoa tree, Theobroma cacao, become a delicious dessert. Members of Princeton’s student‐run bean‐to bar chocolate factory will discuss all of the steps in the chocolate-making process, and will answer questions about the history and production of chocolate.

X377: Anyone Can Learn to Sing Well
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lori Trojak

Ever wanted to learn to sing but are intimidated by others around you. Or if you have a voice that sounds great in the shower but you are afraid you are off key out of the shower and just lip sing when you are in Church or public? Then this class is for you. I will teach you the basics of singing. Techniques, warmup activities, practices, vibrato (how to vibrate your voice), how to stay on pitch and a lot more. If you already sing, I will also discuss strengthening your voice, belting, protecting your voice and varying the sounds.
You have a unique instrument that no one else on Earth has – your voice – learn how to use it!


Prerequisites
None.

X359: Puzzlehunt! Full!
Difficulty: **

Try your hand at puzzle hunting! A puzzle hunt is a exciting team challenge made up of short puzzles that stretch your logic, reasoning, pattern recognition, intuition, and creativity. Puzzle hunting is fun for all people, and even the smartest among us often find it a challenge. Whether you're a veteran hunter or are just hearing about puzzle hunts for the first time, you'll have a great time here!

X349: Haircutting 101
Difficulty: *

Haircutting is an art. Join us for the afternoon as we go over the basics of guys' haircuts along with a live demo. Afterwards, since we trust you, you can cut our hair too.

X367: Rock Climbing 101 Section #1
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nathaniel Cope

The world exists in three dimensions - why are you only moving in two of them? Come to the Princeton University Outdoor Action Rock Wall on Splash Day for a adventure-filled introduction to one of the greatest sports in the world, taught by real Princeton students and rock climbers! First, you'll learn safety knots, terminology, and how to belay - then, you'll take on the Wall itself, climbing over thirty feet under any one of our thirteen sections of Wall! Challenge is all by choice - no one will be forced to climb higher than they want to! Guys, girls, and other-gendered beings of all ages are welcome for either of two three-hour sections of music, climbing, and all-around fun! Never touched a wall before or been climbing since birth, guaranteed we have something for you! Bring your friends, bring your enemies, bring yourself - CLIMB FOREVER!


Prerequisites
1. Yourself 2. A willingness to try something new! 3. Basically nothing else! We provide all the harnesses, shoes, carabiners and such free of charge! (pants/leggings/garments that cover the knees are recommended - people tend to scrape their knees against the wall as they climb otherwise)

X371: Bubbles and Crashes: Trading and Financial Crises
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Oliver Sun

What determines the value of a commodity or stock? Are there any discernible patterns to the declines and rallies of the stock market? How can an astute investor reap profits from playing the game of finance?

From the Dutch tulip mania of the 17th century, to the subprime mortgage crisis of recent memory, the tides of fortune have displayed a fickle nature toward financial markets. This course will examine some of the most significant bubbles and crashes in economic history, seeking to establish their causes and underlying similarities. This course will also evaluate the effectiveness of various analytic theories that attempt to predict market movements.

This course will also feature a trading simulation.

X331: Mind = Blown 101 (Elementary Paradoxes and Logic)
Difficulty: ***

\textit{If you replaced every word in this course description over the course of a year, would you still have the same course description one year later?}\\

If questions like this keep you up at night, then stop by our brief course on Paradoxes! We will begin with an overview of the field of logic, and then dive right into discussing some of the most intriguing, baffling, and mind blowing paraxodes ever conceived. Come to discover the limits of rational thought, stay because of the crippling existential despair!

X356: Latin Dance 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mimi Orro

Love dancing? Never tried to dance but always wanted to learn? Or maybe you love trying new things? Then come to the Latin Dance 101 class taught by members our very own Princeton Urban Latin Dance Company: Mas Flow. You will learn the history of different Latin dances such as bachata, merengue, salsa, reggaeton, kizomba, and more. You will also learn the basics steps of these dances in addition to fun choreography in a low-pressure environment. Our dance teachers are very outgoing and hilarious, and we guarantee you will have tons of fun and learn a lot of new moves that you can't wait to show off.

X339: Introduction to American Sign Language
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jasmine Lin, Angela Xu

An American Sign Language class for beginners- come to learn the basics of ASL, including fingerspelling as well as some basic phrases and conversational skills. No prior knowledge or experience needed.