Princeton Splash
Welcome to Princeton Splash, a student-run organization at Princeton University

Splash Biography



JENNA NEWMAN, Princeton senior studying Molecular Biology




Major: Molecular Biology

College/Employer: Princeton

Year of Graduation: 2015

Picture of Jenna Newman

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Interested in obtaining a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

S244: Virology in Splash Spring 15 (Apr. 25, 2015)
Viruses, although discovered on the eve of the twentieth century, are ancient agents of disease (or sometimes, unnoticed residents) in the human body. In this class, we will learn how to categorize viruses and understand the answers to the following questions: 1) What do all viruses have in common? How do they contain such powerful information in small genomes and what are some tricks they use to optimize storage of this information? What techniques do viruses employ to vary their genomes to generate diverse genotypes, and consequently, phenotypes? 2) Why are viruses like Ebola or rabies so dangerous (note- they are highly fatal for very different reasons, both of which we will cover)? 3) Why do we have vaccines against some viral diseases, such as polio, while we have yet to develop a vaccine against HIV? Why is it that the vaccine for influenza changes each year? We will also briefly cover other infectious agents such as prions and viroids.


S144: Virology in Splash Spring 14 (Apr. 26, 2014)
Viruses, although discovered on the eve of the twentieth century, are ancient agents of disease (or sometimes, unnoticed residents) in the human body. In this class, we will learn how to categorize viruses and understand the answers to the following questions: 1) What do all viruses have in common? How do they contain such powerful information in small genomes and what are some tricks they use to optimize storage of this information? What techniques do viruses employ to vary their genomes to generate diverse genotypes, and consequently, phenotypes? 2) Why are viruses like Ebola or rabies so dangerous (note- they are highly fatal for very different reasons, both of which we will cover)? 3) Why do we have vaccines against some viral diseases, such as polio, while we have yet to develop a vaccine against HIV? Why is it that the vaccine for influenza changes each year? We will also briefly cover other infectious agents such as prions and viroids.